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tbd, if possible, detailed answers should linked to internal wiki pages
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<!--PVE_IMPORT_START_MARKER-->
 
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<!-- Do not edit - this is autogenerated content -->
=General=
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{{#pvedocs:pve-faq-plain.html}}
==What is a container, CT, VE, Virtual Private Server, VPS?==
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[[Category:Reference Documentation]]
See [[Container and Full Virtualization]]
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<pvehide>
 
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New FAQs are appended to the bottom of this section.
==What is a KVM guest (KVM VM)?==
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What distribution is Proxmox VE based on?
A KVM guest or KVM VM is a guest system running virtualized under Proxmox VE with KVM.
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Proxmox VE is based on Debian GNU/Linux
 
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What license does the Proxmox VE project use?
==What is a Virtual Appliance?==
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Proxmox VE code is licensed under the GNU Affero General Public License,
See [[Overview]]
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version 3.
=Installation and upgrade=
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Will Proxmox VE run on a 32bit processor?
 
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Proxmox VE works only on 64-bit CPUs (AMD or Intel). There is no plan
==Where can I find installation instructions?==
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for 32-bit for the platform.
:See [[Installation]]
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VMs and Containers can be both 32-bit and/or 64-bit.
 
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Does my CPU support virtualization?
=Proxmox VE command line tools=
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To check if your CPU is virtualization compatible, check for the vmx
See [[Command line tools]]
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or svm tag in this command output:
 
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egrep '(vmx|svm)' /proc/cpuinfo
=Networking=
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Supported Intel CPUs
 
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64-bit processors with
==How do I configure bridged networking in an OpenVZ Ubuntu/Debian container?==
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Intel
 
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Virtualization Technology (Intel VT-x) support. (List of processors with Intel VT and 64-bit)
1. In the web gui under Virtual Machine configuration got to the network tab.
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Supported AMD CPUs
 
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64-bit processors with
2. Remove the ip address for venet and save. (Bridged Ethernet Devices will appear)
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AMD
 
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Virtualization Technology (AMD-V) support.
3. SSH into your host system and enter the container you want set bridge networking for:
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What is a container, CT, VE, Virtual Private Server, VPS?
 
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Operating-system-level virtualization is a server-virtualization
# vzctl enter <VMID>
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method where the kernel of an operating system allows for multiple
 
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isolated user-space instances, instead of just one. We call such
4. edit  /etc/network/interfaces using using the following format and save. (replace with settings for your network)
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instances containers. As containers use the host&#8217;s kernel they are
 
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limited to Linux guests.
  auto lo
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What is a QEMU/KVM guest (or VM)?
  iface lo inet loopback
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A QEMU/KVM guest (or VM) is a guest system running virtualized under
   
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Proxmox VE using QEMU and the Linux KVM kernel module.
  auto eth0
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What is QEMU?
  iface eth0 inet static
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QEMU is a generic and open source machine emulator and
        address 10.0.0.17
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virtualizer. QEMU uses the Linux KVM kernel module to achieve near
        netmask 255.255.255.0
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native performance by executing the guest code directly on the host
        network 10.0.0.0
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CPU.
        broadcast 10.0.0.255
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It is not limited to Linux guests but allows arbitrary operating systems
        gateway 10.0.0.10
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to run.
 
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How long will my Proxmox VE version be supported?
5. Shutdown the container.
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Proxmox VE versions are supported at least as long as the corresponding
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Debian Version is
6. Go back to web gui and under "Bridged Ethernet Devices"  configure eth0 to vmbr0  and save. (a mac address will be automatically assigned)
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oldstable. Proxmox VE uses a
 
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rolling release model and using the latest stable version is always
7. Start the container.
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recommended.
 
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  Proxmox VE Version
Finally check that networking is working by entering the guest and viewing the results of ifconfig 
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  Debian Version
 
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  First Release
=Supported CPU chips=
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  Debian EOL
==Intel==
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  Proxmox EOL
* [[Media:Intel-VT-LG775.jpg|Intel VT - LG775 chips]]
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Proxmox VE 6.x
 
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Debian 10 (Buster)
==AMD==
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2019-07
 
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tba
=Troubleshooting=
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tba
 
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Proxmox VE 5.x
==I can't switch virtual consoles in Linux KVM guests with alt-F1, alt-F2...==
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Debian 9 (Stretch)
 
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2017-07
VNC viewer does not pass some key combinations or they may be intercepted by your operating system.
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2020-07
 
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2020-07
To send custom key combinations to the guest, go to "Monitor" in Virtual Machine Configuration for a given guest and use "sendkey" command.
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Proxmox VE 4.x
 
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Debian 8 (Jessie)
For example, to switch to the third console (tty3) you would use:
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2015-10
 
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2018-06
sendkey alt-f3
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2018-06
 
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Proxmox VE 3.x
 
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Debian 7 (Wheezy)
==How can I send sysrq to Linux KVM guests?==
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2013-05
 
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2016-04
Similarly to the above, go to "Monitor" in Virtual Machine Configuration for a given guest and use "sendkey" command.
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2017-02
 
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Proxmox VE 2.x
For example, to issue "Emergency Sync", you would use:
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Debian 6 (Squeeze)
 
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2012-04
sendkey alt-sysrq-s
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2014-05
 
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2014-05
In the VNC viewer for the given guest you should see:
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Proxmox VE 1.x
 
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Debian 5 (Lenny)
SysRq : Emergency Sync
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2008-10
 
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2012-03
You should also see this entry if you run "dmesg" on this guest.
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2013-01
 
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How can I upgrade Proxmox VE to the next release?
See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_SysRq_key for a full reference of possible combinations.
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Minor version upgrades, for example upgrading from Proxmox VE in version 5.1
 
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to 5.2, can be done just like any normal update, either through the Web
 
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GUI Node &#8594; Updates panel or through the CLI with:
==How can I access Linux guests through a serial console?==
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apt update
 
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apt full-upgrade
Sometimes, it is necessary to access the guest through a serial console:
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Always ensure you correctly setup the
* you lost network access to the guest and VNC is either too slow for you or don't have the features you need (i.e. easy copy/paste between other terminals)
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package repositories and only
* your guest freezes or kernel panics, you want to debug it, but it's impossible to capture all messages on VNC screen
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continue with the actual upgrade if apt update did not hit any error.
* you are familiar with <code>xm console <guest></code> from Xen and you want to use a similar feature here
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Major version upgrades, for example going from Proxmox VE 4.4 to 5.0, are
 
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also supported. They must be carefully planned and tested and should
 
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never be started without having a current backup ready.
The necessary steps are:
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Although the specific upgrade steps depend on your respective setup, we
* on Proxmox VE host, in guest's configuration file in <code>/etc/qemu-server/<VMID>.conf</code> add:
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provide general instructions and advice of how a upgrade should be
 
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performed:
args: -serial unix:/var/run/qemu-server/<VMID>.serial,server,nowait
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Upgrade from Proxmox VE 5.x to 6.0
 
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Upgrade from Proxmox VE 4.x to 5.0
This will open console in <code>/var/run/qemu-server/<VMID>.serial</code> socket file, which can be accessed by minicom or other serial communication program.
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Upgrade from Proxmox VE 3.x to 4.0
 
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LXC vs LXD vs Proxmox Containers vs Docker
An alternative is to add:
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LXC is a userspace interface for the Linux kernel containment
 
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features. Through a powerful API and simple tools, it lets Linux users
args: -serial tcp:localhost:6000,server,nowait
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easily create and manage system containers. LXC, as well as the former
 
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OpenVZ, aims at system virtualization, i.e. allows you to run a
With this, you can connect to guest's serial console with telnet. Note that with telnet, any passwords will be visible on the screen.
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complete OS inside a container, where you log in as ssh, add users,
 
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run apache, etc&#8230;
 
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LXD is building on top of LXC to provide a new, better user
* on guest, in /etc/inittab, look for lines similar to the ones below and make sure you have "ttyS0" there - this would be your serial console:
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experience. Under the hood, LXD uses LXC through liblxc and its Go
 
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binding to create and manage the containers. It&#8217;s basically an
5:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty tty5
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alternative to LXC&#8217;s tools and distribution template system with the
6:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty ttyS0
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added features that come from being controllable over the network.
 
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Proxmox Containers also aims at system virtualization, and thus uses
If you want kernel messages to be shown on both serial and VGA consoles, you have to add a kernel parameter in your bootloader's configuration. For grub, it would be these "console" entries:
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LXC as the basis of its own container offer. The Proxmox Container
 
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Toolkit is called pct, and is tightly coupled with Proxmox VE. That means
kernel (hd0,0)/boot/vmlinuz root=LABEL=guest-root console=ttyS0 console=tty0
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that it is aware of the cluster setup, and it can use the same network
 
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and storage resources as fully virtualized VMs. You can even use the
 
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Proxmox VE firewall, create and restore backups, or manage containers using
To access the guest from minicom, configure it to use a path such as <code>unix#/var/run/qemu-server/<VMID>.serial</code> in "cOnfigure Minicom -> Serial port setup -> Serial Device".
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the HA framework. Everything can be controlled over the network using
 
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the Proxmox VE API.
 
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Docker aims at running a single application running in a contained
To use multiple minicom configurations for several guests, create a file like /etc/minicom/minirc.someguest for each of your guests, with contents:
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environment. Hence you&#8217;re managing a docker instance from the host with the
 
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docker toolkit. It is not recommended to run docker directly on your
pu port            unix#/var/run/qemu-server/<VMID>.serial
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Proxmox VE host.
pu minit
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You can however perfectly install and use docker inside a Proxmox Qemu
pu mreset
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VM, and thus getting the benefit of software containerization with the very
 
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strong isolation that VMs provide.
 
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</pvehide>
Then, start the console with:
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<!--PVE_IMPORT_END_MARKER-->
 
 
minicom someguest
 
 
 
 
 
See also http://www.proxmox.com/forum/showthread.php?p=5615
 
 
 
==How can I assign a physical disk to a VM?==
 
Add it first in the web interface, then use:
 
qm set <vmid> -ide# /dev/sdb
 
Or:
 
qm set <vmid> -ide# /dev/disk/by-id/[your disk ID]
 
 
 
...since having the drive letter change (should you add a drive) might have unintended consequences.
 
 
 
Also see /etc/qemu-server/<vmid>.conf
 
 
 
==How can I assign a physical disk to a CT?==
 
See http://wiki.openvz.org/Bind_mounts
 

Latest revision as of 11:23, 16 July 2019

Note New FAQs are appended to the bottom of this section.
  1. What distribution is Proxmox VE based on?

    Proxmox VE is based on Debian GNU/Linux

  2. What license does the Proxmox VE project use?

    Proxmox VE code is licensed under the GNU Affero General Public License, version 3.

  3. Will Proxmox VE run on a 32bit processor?

    Proxmox VE works only on 64-bit CPUs (AMD or Intel). There is no plan for 32-bit for the platform.

    Note VMs and Containers can be both 32-bit and/or 64-bit.
  4. Does my CPU support virtualization?

    To check if your CPU is virtualization compatible, check for the vmx or svm tag in this command output:

    egrep '(vmx|svm)' /proc/cpuinfo
  5. Supported Intel CPUs

    64-bit processors with Intel Virtualization Technology (Intel VT-x) support. (List of processors with Intel VT and 64-bit)

  6. Supported AMD CPUs

    64-bit processors with AMD Virtualization Technology (AMD-V) support.

  7. What is a container, CT, VE, Virtual Private Server, VPS?

    Operating-system-level virtualization is a server-virtualization method where the kernel of an operating system allows for multiple isolated user-space instances, instead of just one. We call such instances containers. As containers use the host’s kernel they are limited to Linux guests.

  8. What is a QEMU/KVM guest (or VM)?

    A QEMU/KVM guest (or VM) is a guest system running virtualized under Proxmox VE using QEMU and the Linux KVM kernel module.

  9. What is QEMU?

    QEMU is a generic and open source machine emulator and virtualizer. QEMU uses the Linux KVM kernel module to achieve near native performance by executing the guest code directly on the host CPU. It is not limited to Linux guests but allows arbitrary operating systems to run.

  10. How long will my Proxmox VE version be supported?

    Proxmox VE versions are supported at least as long as the corresponding Debian Version is oldstable. Proxmox VE uses a rolling release model and using the latest stable version is always recommended.

    Proxmox VE Version Debian Version First Release Debian EOL Proxmox EOL

    Proxmox VE 6.x

    Debian 10 (Buster)

    2019-07

    tba

    tba

    Proxmox VE 5.x

    Debian 9 (Stretch)

    2017-07

    2020-07

    2020-07

    Proxmox VE 4.x

    Debian 8 (Jessie)

    2015-10

    2018-06

    2018-06

    Proxmox VE 3.x

    Debian 7 (Wheezy)

    2013-05

    2016-04

    2017-02

    Proxmox VE 2.x

    Debian 6 (Squeeze)

    2012-04

    2014-05

    2014-05

    Proxmox VE 1.x

    Debian 5 (Lenny)

    2008-10

    2012-03

    2013-01

  11. How can I upgrade Proxmox VE to the next release?

    Minor version upgrades, for example upgrading from Proxmox VE in version 5.1 to 5.2, can be done just like any normal update, either through the Web GUI Node → Updates panel or through the CLI with:

    apt update
    apt full-upgrade
    Note Always ensure you correctly setup the package repositories and only continue with the actual upgrade if apt update did not hit any error.

    Major version upgrades, for example going from Proxmox VE 4.4 to 5.0, are also supported. They must be carefully planned and tested and should never be started without having a current backup ready. Although the specific upgrade steps depend on your respective setup, we provide general instructions and advice of how a upgrade should be performed:

  12. LXC vs LXD vs Proxmox Containers vs Docker

    LXC is a userspace interface for the Linux kernel containment features. Through a powerful API and simple tools, it lets Linux users easily create and manage system containers. LXC, as well as the former OpenVZ, aims at system virtualization, i.e. allows you to run a complete OS inside a container, where you log in as ssh, add users, run apache, etc…

    LXD is building on top of LXC to provide a new, better user experience. Under the hood, LXD uses LXC through liblxc and its Go binding to create and manage the containers. It’s basically an alternative to LXC’s tools and distribution template system with the added features that come from being controllable over the network.

    Proxmox Containers also aims at system virtualization, and thus uses LXC as the basis of its own container offer. The Proxmox Container Toolkit is called pct, and is tightly coupled with Proxmox VE. That means that it is aware of the cluster setup, and it can use the same network and storage resources as fully virtualized VMs. You can even use the Proxmox VE firewall, create and restore backups, or manage containers using the HA framework. Everything can be controlled over the network using the Proxmox VE API.

    Docker aims at running a single application running in a contained environment. Hence you’re managing a docker instance from the host with the docker toolkit. It is not recommended to run docker directly on your Proxmox VE host.

    Note You can however perfectly install and use docker inside a Proxmox Qemu VM, and thus getting the benefit of software containerization with the very strong isolation that VMs provide.