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== Introduction ==
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{{#pvedocs:pve-installation-plain.html}}
Proxmox VE installs the complete operating system and management tools in 3 to 5 minutes (depending on the hardware used).  
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[[Category:Reference Documentation]]
 
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<pvehide>
Including the following:
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Proxmox VE is based on Debian. This is why the install disk images (ISO files)
 
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provided by Proxmox include a complete Debian system as well as all necessary
*Complete operating system (Debian Linux, 64-bit)
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Proxmox VE packages.
*Partition the hard drive with ext4 (alternative ext3 or xfs) or ZFS
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See the support table in the FAQ for the
*[[Proxmox VE Kernel]] with LXC and KVM support
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relationship between Proxmox VE releases and Debian releases.
*Complete toolset
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The installer will guide you through the setup, allowing you to partition the
*Web based management interface
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local disk(s), apply basic system configurations (for example, timezone,
 
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language, network) and install all required packages. This process should not
Please note, by default the complete server is used and all existing data is removed.  
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take more than a few minutes. Installing with the provided ISO is the
 
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recommended method for new and existing users.
If you want to set custom options for the installer, or need to debug the installation process on your server, you can use some
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Alternatively, Proxmox VE can be installed on top of an existing Debian system. This
[[Debugging_Installation|special boot options]].
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option is only recommended for advanced users because detailed knowledge about
 
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Proxmox VE is required.
=== Video tutorials ===
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Using the Proxmox VE Installer
 
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The installer ISO image includes the following:
*List of all official tutorials on our [http://www.youtube.com/proxmoxve Proxmox VE YouTube Channel]
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Complete operating system (Debian Linux, 64-bit)
*Tutorials in Spanish language on [http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUULBIhA5QDBdNf1pcTZ5UXhek63Fij8z ITexperts.es YouTube Play List]
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The Proxmox VE installer, which partitions the local disk(s) with ext4, XFS,
 
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  BTRFS (technology preview), or ZFS and installs the operating system.
== System requirements ==
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Proxmox VE Linux kernel with KVM and LXC support
 
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Complete toolset for administering virtual machines, containers, the host
For production servers, high quality server equipment is needed. Keep in mind, if you run 10 Virtual Servers on one machine and you then experience a hardware failure, 10 services are lost. Proxmox VE supports clustering, this means that multiple Proxmox VE installations can be centrally managed thanks to the included cluster functionality.
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  system, clusters and all necessary resources
 
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Web-based management interface
Proxmox VE can use local storage (DAS), SAN, NAS and also distributed storage (Ceph RBD). For details see [[Storage Model]]
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All existing data on the for installation selected drives will be removed
 
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during the installation process. The installer does not add boot menu entries
=== Minimum requirements, for evaluation ===
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for other operating systems.
 
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Please insert the prepared installation media
*CPU: 64bit (Intel EMT64 or AMD64), [[FAQ#Supported_CPU_chips|Intel VT/AMD-V capable CPU]]/Mainboard (for KVM Full Virtualization support)
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(for example, USB flash drive or CD-ROM) and boot from it.
*RAM: 1 GB RAM
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Make sure that booting from the installation medium (for example, USB) is
*Hard drive
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enabled in your servers firmware settings.
*One NIC
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After choosing the correct entry (e.g. Boot from USB) the Proxmox VE menu will be
 
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displayed and one of the following options can be selected:
=== Recommended system requirements ===
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Install Proxmox VE
 
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Starts the normal installation.
*CPU: 64bit (Intel EMT64 or AMD64), Multi core CPU recommended, [[FAQ#Supported_CPU_chips|Intel VT/AMD-V capable CPU]]/Mainboard (for KVM Full Virtualization support)
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It&#8217;s possible to use the installation wizard with a keyboard only. Buttons
*RAM: 8 GB is good, more is better
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can be clicked by pressing the ALT key combined with the underlined character
*[[Raid controller|Hardware RAID]] with batteries protected write cache (BBU) or flash based protection ([[Software RAID]] is not supported)
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from the respective button. For example, ALT + N to press a Next button.
*Fast hard drives, best results with 15k rpm SAS, Raid10
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Install Proxmox VE (Debug mode)
*At least two NIC´s, depending on the used storage technology you need more
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Starts the installation in debug mode. A console will be opened at several
 
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installation steps. This helps to debug the situation if something goes wrong.
=== Certified hardware ===
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To exit a debug console, press CTRL-D. This option can be used to boot a live
 
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system with all basic tools available. You can use it, for example, to
Basically you can use any hardware supporting RHEL6, 64 bit. If you are unsure, post in the [http://forum.proxmox.com/ forum].
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repair a degraded ZFS rpool or fix the
 
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bootloader for an existing Proxmox VE setup.
As the browser will be used to manage the Proxmox VE server, it would be prudent to follow [[Safe Browsing settings in Firefox | safe browsing practices]].
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Rescue Boot
 
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With this option you can boot an existing installation. It searches all attached
== Steps to get your Proxmox VE up and running ==
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hard disks. If it finds an existing installation, it boots directly into that
 
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disk using the Linux kernel from the ISO. This can be useful if there are
=== Install Proxmox VE server ===
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problems with the boot block (grub) or the BIOS is unable to read the boot block
 
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from the disk.
See [[Quick installation]]
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Test Memory
 
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Runs memtest86+. This is useful to check if the memory is functional and free
[http://youtu.be/ckvPt1Bp9p0 Proxmox VE installation (Video Tutorial)]
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of errors.
 
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After selecting Install Proxmox VE and accepting the EULA, the prompt to select the
If you need to install the outdated 1.9 release, check [[Installing Proxmox VE v1.9 post Lenny retirement]]
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target hard disk(s) will appear. The Options button opens the dialog to select
 
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the target file system.
=== Optional: Install Proxmox VE on Debian 6 Squeeze (64 bit) ===
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The default file system is ext4. The Logical Volume Manager (LVM) is used when
EOL.
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ext4 or xfs is selected. Additional options to restrict LVM space
 
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can also be set (see below).
See [[Install Proxmox VE on Debian Squeeze]]
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Proxmox VE can be installed on ZFS. As ZFS offers several software RAID levels, this
 
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is an option for systems that don&#8217;t have a hardware RAID controller. The target
=== Optional: Install Proxmox VE on Debian 7 Wheezy (64 bit) ===
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disks must be selected in the Options dialog. More ZFS specific settings can
 
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be changed under Advanced Options (see below).
EOL April 2016
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ZFS on top of any hardware RAID is not supported and can result in data
 
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loss.
See [[Install Proxmox VE on Debian Wheezy]]
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The next page asks for basic configuration options like the location, the time
 
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zone, and keyboard layout. The location is used to select a download server
=== Optional: Install Proxmox VE on Debian 8 Jessie (64 bit) ===
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close by to speed up updates. The installer usually auto-detects these settings.
 
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They only need to be changed in the rare case that auto detection fails or a
See [[Install Proxmox VE on Debian Jessie]]
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different keyboard layout should be used.
 
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Next the password of the superuser (root) and an email address needs to be
=== [[Developer_Workstations_with_Proxmox_VE_and_X11]] ===
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specified. The password must consist of at least 5 characters. It&#8217;s highly
 
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recommended to use a stronger password. Some guidelines are:
This page will cover the install of X11 and a basic Desktop on top of Proxmox. [[Developer_Workstations_with_Proxmox_VE_and_X11#Optional:_Linux_Mint_Mate_Desktop | Optional:_Linux_Mint_Mate_Desktop]] is also available.
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Use a minimum password length of 12 to 14 characters.
 
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Include lowercase and uppercase alphabetic characters, numbers, and symbols.
=== Optional: Install Proxmox VE over iSCSI ===
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Avoid character repetition, keyboard patterns, common dictionary words,
 
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  letter or number sequences, usernames, relative or pet names, romantic links
See [[Proxmox ISCSI installation]]
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  (current or past), and biographical information (for example ID numbers,
 
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  ancestors' names or dates).
=== Proxmox VE web interface ===
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The email address is used to send notifications to the system administrator.
 
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For example:
Configuration is done via the Proxmox web interface, just point your browser to the IP address given during installation (<nowiki>https://youripaddress:8006</nowiki>). Please make sure that your browser has the latest Oracle Java browser plugin installed. Proxmox VE is tested for IE9, Firefox 10 and higher, Google Chrome (latest).  
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Information about available package updates.
 
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Error messages from periodic CRON jobs.
'''Default login is "root" and the root password is defined during the installation process.'''
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The last step is the network configuration. Please note that during installation
 
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you can either use an IPv4 or IPv6 address, but not both. To configure a dual
==== Configure basic system setting ====
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stack node, add additional IP addresses after the installation.
 
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The next step shows a summary of the previously selected options. Re-check every
Please review the NIC setup, IP and hostname.  
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setting and use the Previous button if a setting needs to be changed. To
 
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accept, press Install. The installation starts to format disks and copies
'''Note: changing IP or hostname after cluster creation is not possible (unless you know exactly what you do)'''
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packages to the target. Please wait until this step has finished; then remove
 
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the installation medium and restart your system.
 
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If the installation failed check out specific errors on the second TTY
 
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(&#8216;CTRL + ALT + F2&#8217;), ensure that the systems meets the
==== Get Appliance Templates ====
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minimum requirements. If the installation
 
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is still not working look at the how to get help chapter.
===== Download =====
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Further configuration is done via the Proxmox web interface. Point your browser
 
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to the IP address given during installation (https://youripaddress:8006).
Just go to your content tab of your storage (e.g. "local") and [[Get Virtual Appliances|download pre-built Virtual Appliances]] directly to your server. This list is maintained by the Proxmox VE team and more and more Appliances will be available. This is the easiest way and a good place to start.
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Default login is "root" (realm PAM) and the root password is defined
 
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during the installation process.
===== Use a NFS share for ISO´s =====
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Advanced LVM Configuration Options
 
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The installer creates a Volume Group (VG) called pve, and additional Logical
If you have a NFS server you can use a NFS share for storing ISO images. To start, configure the NFS ISO store on the web interface (Configuration/Storage).  
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Volumes (LVs) called root, data, and swap. To control the size of these
 
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volumes use:
===== Upload from your desktop =====
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hdsize
 
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Defines the total hard disk size to be used. This way you can reserve free space
If you already got Virtually Appliances you can upload them via the upload button. To install a virtual machine from an ISO image (using KVM full virtualization) just upload the ISO file via the upload button.
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on the hard disk for further partitioning (for example for an additional PV and
 
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VG on the same hard disk that can be used for LVM storage).
===== Directly to file system =====
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swapsize
 
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Defines the size of the swap volume. The default is the size of the installed
Templates and ISO images are stored on the Proxmox VE server (see /var/lib/vz/template/cache for openvz templates and /var/lib/vz/template/iso for ISO images). You can also transfer templates and ISO images via secure copy (scp) to these directories. If you work on a windows desktop, you can use a graphical scp client like [http://winscp.net winscp].
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memory, minimum 4 GB and maximum 8 GB. The resulting value cannot be greater
 
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than hdsize/8.
=== Optional: Reverting Thin-LVM to "old" Behavior of <code>/var/lib/vz</code> (Proxmox 4.2 and later) ===
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If set to 0, no swap volume will be created.
 
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maxroot
If you installed Proxmox 4.2 (or later), you see yourself confronted with a changed layout of your data. There is no mounted <code>/var/lib/vz</code> LVM volume anymore, instead you find a thin-provisioned volume. This is technically the right choice, but one sometimes want to get the old behavior back, which is described here. This section describes the steps to revert to the "old" layout on a freshly installed Proxmox 4.2:
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Defines the maximum size of the root volume, which stores the operation
 
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system. The maximum limit of the root volume size is hdsize/4.
* After the Installation your storage configuration in <code>/etc/pve/storage.cfg</code> will look like this:
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maxvz
<pre>
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Defines the maximum size of the data volume. The actual size of the data
dir: local
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volume is:
        path /var/lib/vz
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datasize = hdsize - rootsize - swapsize - minfree
        content iso,vztmpl,backup
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Where datasize cannot be bigger than maxvz.
 
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In case of LVM thin, the data pool will only be created if datasize is
lvmthin: local-lvm
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bigger than 4GB.
        thinpool data
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If set to 0, no data volume will be created and the storage
        vgname pve
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configuration will be adapted accordingly.
        content rootdir,images
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minfree
</pre>
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Defines the amount of free space left in the LVM volume group pve. With more
* You can delete the thin-volume via GUI or manually and have to set the local directory to store images and container aswell. You should have such a config in the end:
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than 128GB storage available the default is 16GB, else hdsize/8 will be used.
<pre>
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LVM requires free space in the VG for snapshot creation (not required for
dir: local
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lvmthin snapshots).
        path /var/lib/vz
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Advanced ZFS Configuration Options
        maxfiles 0
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The installer creates the ZFS pool rpool. No swap space is created but you can
        content backup,iso,vztmpl,rootdir,images
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reserve some unpartitioned space on the install disks for swap. You can also
</pre>
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create a swap zvol after the installation, although this can lead to problems.
* Now you need to recreate <code>/var/lib/vz</code>
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(see ZFS swap notes).
<pre>
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ashift
root@pve-42 ~ > lvs
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Defines the ashift value for the created pool. The ashift needs to be set at
   LV   VG  Attr      LSize  Pool Origin Data%  Meta%  Move Log Cpy%Sync Convert
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least to the sector-size of the underlying disks (2 to the power of ashift is
   data pve  twi-a-tz-- 16.38g            0.00  0.49
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the sector-size), or any disk which might be put in the pool (for example the
  root pve  -wi-ao----  7.75g
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replacement of a defective disk).
  swap pve  -wi-ao----  3.88g
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compress
 
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Defines whether compression is enabled for rpool.
root@pve-42 ~ > lvremove pve/data
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checksum
Do you really want to remove active logical volume data? [y/n]: y
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Defines which checksumming algorithm should be used for rpool.
  Logical volume "data" successfully removed
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copies
 
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Defines the copies parameter for rpool. Check the zfs(8) manpage for the
root@pve-42 ~ > lvcreate --name data -l +100%FREE pve
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semantics, and why this does not replace redundancy on disk-level.
  Logical volume "data" created.
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hdsize
 
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Defines the total hard disk size to be used. This is useful to save free space
root@pve-42 ~ > mkfs.ext4 /dev/pve/data
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on the hard disk(s) for further partitioning (for example to create a
mke2fs 1.42.12 (29-Aug-2014)
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swap-partition). hdsize is only honored for bootable disks, that is only the
Discarding device blocks: done
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first disk or mirror for RAID0, RAID1 or RAID10, and all disks in RAID-Z[123].
Creating filesystem with 5307392 4k blocks and 1327104 inodes
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ZFS Performance Tips
Filesystem UUID: 310d346a-de4e-48ae-83d0-4119088af2e3
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ZFS works best with a lot of memory. If you intend to use ZFS make sure to have
Superblock backups stored on blocks:
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enough RAM available for it. A good calculation is 4GB plus 1GB RAM for each TB
        32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736, 1605632, 2654208,
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RAW disk space.
        4096000
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ZFS can use a dedicated drive as write cache, called the ZFS Intent Log (ZIL).
 
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Use a fast drive (SSD) for it. It can be added after installation with the
Allocating group tables: done
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following command:
Writing inode tables: done
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# zpool add &lt;pool-name&gt; log &lt;/dev/path_to_fast_ssd&gt;
Creating journal (32768 blocks): done
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Video Tutorials
Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done
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List of all official tutorials on our
</pre>
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   Proxmox VE YouTube Channel
* Then add the new volume in your <code>/etc/fstab</code>:
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Tutorials in Spanish language on
<pre>
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   ITexperts.es
/dev/pve/data /var/lib/vz ext4 defaults 0 1
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   YouTube Play List
</pre>
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See Also
* Restart to check if everything survives a reboot.
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Prepare Installation Media
 
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Install Proxmox VE on Debian Buster
You should end up with a working "old-style" configuration where you "see" your files as it was before Proxmox 4.2
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System Requirements
 
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Package Repositories
== Create Virtual Machines ==
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Host System Administration
 
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Network Configuration
=== Linux Containers (LXC) ===
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Installation: Tips and Tricks
 
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</pvehide>
See [[Linux Container]] for a detailed description. Get LXC images from [http://images.linuxcontainers.org/ images.linuxcontainers.org] | [http://images.linuxcontainers.org/images/ Read their descriptions].
+
<!--PVE_IMPORT_END_MARKER-->
 
 
=== Container (OpenVZ) ===
 
 
 
[[Image:Screen-create-container-mailgateway.png|thumb]] [[Image:Screen-create-container-mailgateway-log.png|thumb]] [[Image:Screen-virtual-machine-detail1.png|thumb]]
 
 
 
First [[#Get_Appliance_Templates|get the adequate(s) appliance(s) template(s)]].
 
 
 
Then just click "Create CT":
 
 
 
'''General'''
 
 
 
*Node: If you have several Proxmox VE servers, select the node where you want to create the new container
 
*VM ID: choose a virtual machine identification number, just use the given ID or overwrite the suggested one
 
*Hostname: give a unique server name for the new container
 
*Resource Pool: select the previously resource pool (optional)
 
*Storage: select the storage for your container
 
*Password: set the root password for your container
 
 
 
'''Template'''
 
 
 
*Storage: select your template data store (you need to download templates before you can select them here)
 
*Template: choose the template
 
 
 
'''Resources'''
 
 
 
*Memory (MB): set the memory (RAM)
 
*Swap (MB): set the swap
 
*Disk size (GB): set the total disk size
 
*CPUs: set the number of CPUs (if you run java inside your container, choose at least 2 here)
 
 
 
'''Network'''
 
 
 
*Routed mode (venet): default([http://wiki.openvz.org/Venet venet]) give a unique IP
 
*Briged mode
 
 
 
- in only some case you need Bridged Ethernet([http://wiki.openvz.org/Veth veth]) (see [http://wiki.openvz.org/Differences_between_venet_and_veth Differences_between_venet_and_veth] on OpenVZ wiki for details) If you select Brigded Ethernet, the IP configuration has to be done in the container, like you would do it on a physical server.
 
 
 
'''DNS'''
 
 
 
*DNS Domain: e.g. yourdomain.com
 
*First/Second DNS Servers: enter DNS servers
 
 
 
'''Confirm'''
 
 
 
This tab shows a summary, please check if everything is done as needed. If you need to change a setting, you can jump to the previous tabs just by clicking.
 
 
 
After you clicked "Finish", all settings are applied - wait for completion (this process can take between a view seconds and up to a minute, depends on the used template and your hardware).
 
 
 
'''CentOS 7'''
 
 
 
If you can't PING a CentOS 7 container: In order to get rid of problems with venet0 when running a CentOS 7 container (OpenVZ), just activate the patch redhat-add_ip.sh-patch as follows:
 
 
 
1. transfer the patchfile to your working directory into Proxmox VE host (i.e:/ root) and extract it (unzip)
 
2. perform this command:
 
  # patch -p0 < redhat-add_ip.sh-patch
 
3. stop and start the respective container
 
 
 
Patch file: http://forum.proxmox.com/threads/22770-fix-for-centos-7-container-networking
 
 
 
=== Video Tutorials ===
 
 
 
*See [http://www.youtube.com/proxmoxve Proxmox VE YouTube Channel]
 
 
 
== Virtual Machines (KVM) ==
 
 
 
Just click "Create VM":
 
 
 
=== General ===
 
 
 
*Node: If you have several Proxmox VE servers, select the node where you want to create the new VM
 
*VM ID: choose a virtual machine identification number, just use the given ID or overwrite the suggested one
 
*Name: choose a name for your VM (this is not the hostname), can be changed any time
 
*Resource Pool: select the previously resource pool (optional)
 
 
 
=== OS ===
 
 
 
Select the Operating System (OS) of your VM
 
 
 
=== CD/DVD ===
 
  
*Use CD/DVD disc image file (iso): Select the storage where you previously uploaded your iso images and choose the file
 
*Use physical CD/DVD Drive: choose this to use the CD/DVD from your Proxmox VE node
 
*Do not use any media: choose this if you do not want any media
 
 
=== Hard disk ===
 
 
* Bus/Device: choose the bus type, as long as your guest supports go for ''virtio''
 
* Storage: select the storage where you want to store the disk Disk size (GB): define the size
 
* Format: Define the disk image format. For good performance, go for raw. If you plan to use snapshots, go for qcow2.
 
* Cache: define the cache policy for the virtual disk
 
* Limits: (if necessary) set the maximum transfer speeds
 
 
=== CPU ===
 
 
*Sockets: set the number of CPU sockets
 
*Cores: set the number of CPU Cores per socket
 
*CPU type: select CPU type
 
*Total cores: never use more CPU cores than physical available on the Proxmox VE host
 
 
=== Memory ===
 
 
*Memory (MB): set the memory (RAM) for your VM
 
 
=== Network ===
 
 
*Briged mode: this is the default setting, just choose the Brigde where you want to connect your VM. If you want to use VLAN, you can define the VLAN tag for the VM
 
*NAT mode
 
*No network device
 
*Model: choose the emulated network device, as long as your guest support it, go for virtio
 
*MAC address: use 'auto' or overwrite with a valid and unique MAC address
 
*Rate limit (MB/s): set a speed limit for this network adapter
 
 
=== Confirm ===
 
 
This tab shows a summary, please check if everything is done as needed. If you need to change a setting, you can jump to the previous tabs just by clicking. After you clicked "Finish", all settings are applied - wait for completion (this process just takes a second).
 
 
== Video Tutorials ==
 
 
*See [http://www.youtube.com/proxmoxve Proxmox VE YouTube Channel]
 
 
== Managing Virtual Machines ==
 
 
Go to "VM Manager/Virtual Machines" to see a list of your Virtual Machines.
 
 
Basic tasks can be done by clicking on the red arrow - drop down menu:
 
 
*start, restart, shutdown, stop
 
*migrate: migrate a Virtual Machine to another physical host (you need at least two Proxmox VE servers - see [[Proxmox VE Cluster]]
 
*console: using the VNC console for container virtualization automatically logs in via root. For managing KVM Virtual Machine, the console shows the screen of the full virtualized machine)
 
 
For a '''detailed view''' and '''configuration changes''' just click on a Virtual Machine row in the list of VMs.
 
 
"Logs" on a container Virtual Machine:
 
 
*Boot/Init: shows the Boot/Init logs generated during start or stop
 
*Command: see the current/last executed task
 
*Syslog: see the real time syslog of the Virtual Machine
 
 
== Networking and Firewall ==
 
 
See [[Network Model]] and [[Proxmox VE Firewall]]
 
  
 
[[Category:HOWTO]] [[Category:Installation]]
 
[[Category:HOWTO]] [[Category:Installation]]
[[Category:Reference Documentation]]
 

Revision as of 10:27, 17 November 2021

Proxmox VE is based on Debian. This is why the install disk images (ISO files) provided by Proxmox include a complete Debian system as well as all necessary Proxmox VE packages.

Tip See the support table in the FAQ for the relationship between Proxmox VE releases and Debian releases.

The installer will guide you through the setup, allowing you to partition the local disk(s), apply basic system configurations (for example, timezone, language, network) and install all required packages. This process should not take more than a few minutes. Installing with the provided ISO is the recommended method for new and existing users.

Alternatively, Proxmox VE can be installed on top of an existing Debian system. This option is only recommended for advanced users because detailed knowledge about Proxmox VE is required.

Using the Proxmox VE Installer

The installer ISO image includes the following:

  • Complete operating system (Debian Linux, 64-bit)

  • The Proxmox VE installer, which partitions the local disk(s) with ext4, XFS, BTRFS (technology preview), or ZFS and installs the operating system.

  • Proxmox VE Linux kernel with KVM and LXC support

  • Complete toolset for administering virtual machines, containers, the host system, clusters and all necessary resources

  • Web-based management interface

Note All existing data on the for installation selected drives will be removed during the installation process. The installer does not add boot menu entries for other operating systems.

Please insert the prepared installation media (for example, USB flash drive or CD-ROM) and boot from it.

Tip Make sure that booting from the installation medium (for example, USB) is enabled in your servers firmware settings and secure boot is disabled.
screenshot/pve-grub-menu.png

After choosing the correct entry (e.g. Boot from USB) the Proxmox VE menu will be displayed and one of the following options can be selected:

Install Proxmox VE

Starts the normal installation.

Tip It’s possible to use the installation wizard with a keyboard only. Buttons can be clicked by pressing the ALT key combined with the underlined character from the respective button. For example, ALT + N to press a Next button.
Advanced Options: Install Proxmox VE (Debug mode)

Starts the installation in debug mode. A console will be opened at several installation steps. This helps to debug the situation if something goes wrong. To exit a debug console, press CTRL-D. This option can be used to boot a live system with all basic tools available. You can use it, for example, to repair a degraded ZFS rpool or fix the bootloader for an existing Proxmox VE setup.

Advanced Options: Rescue Boot

With this option you can boot an existing installation. It searches all attached hard disks. If it finds an existing installation, it boots directly into that disk using the Linux kernel from the ISO. This can be useful if there are problems with the boot block (grub) or the BIOS is unable to read the boot block from the disk.

Advanced Options: Test Memory

Runs memtest86+. This is useful to check if the memory is functional and free of errors.

screenshot/pve-select-target-disk.png

After selecting Install Proxmox VE and accepting the EULA, the prompt to select the target hard disk(s) will appear. The Options button opens the dialog to select the target file system.

The default file system is ext4. The Logical Volume Manager (LVM) is used when ext4 or xfs is selected. Additional options to restrict LVM space can also be set (see below).

Proxmox VE can be installed on ZFS. As ZFS offers several software RAID levels, this is an option for systems that don’t have a hardware RAID controller. The target disks must be selected in the Options dialog. More ZFS specific settings can be changed under Advanced Options (see below).

Warning ZFS on top of any hardware RAID is not supported and can result in data loss.
screenshot/pve-select-location.png

The next page asks for basic configuration options like the location, the time zone, and keyboard layout. The location is used to select a download server close by to speed up updates. The installer usually auto-detects these settings. They only need to be changed in the rare case that auto detection fails or a different keyboard layout should be used.

screenshot/pve-set-password.png

Next the password of the superuser (root) and an email address needs to be specified. The password must consist of at least 5 characters. It’s highly recommended to use a stronger password. Some guidelines are:

  • Use a minimum password length of 12 to 14 characters.

  • Include lowercase and uppercase alphabetic characters, numbers, and symbols.

  • Avoid character repetition, keyboard patterns, common dictionary words, letter or number sequences, usernames, relative or pet names, romantic links (current or past), and biographical information (for example ID numbers, ancestors' names or dates).

The email address is used to send notifications to the system administrator. For example:

  • Information about available package updates.

  • Error messages from periodic CRON jobs.

screenshot/pve-setup-network.png

The last step is the network configuration. Please note that during installation you can either use an IPv4 or IPv6 address, but not both. To configure a dual stack node, add additional IP addresses after the installation.

screenshot/pve-installation.png

The next step shows a summary of the previously selected options. Re-check every setting and use the Previous button if a setting needs to be changed. To accept, press Install. The installation starts to format disks and copies packages to the target. Please wait until this step has finished; then remove the installation medium and restart your system.

screenshot/pve-install-summary.png

If the installation failed, check out specific errors on the second TTY (‘CTRL + ALT + F2’) and ensure that the systems meets the minimum requirements. If the installation is still not working, look at the how to get help chapter.

Further configuration is done via the Proxmox web interface. Point your browser to the IP address given during installation (https://youripaddress:8006).

Note Default login is "root" (realm PAM) and the root password was defined during the installation process.

Advanced LVM Configuration Options

The installer creates a Volume Group (VG) called pve, and additional Logical Volumes (LVs) called root, data, and swap. To control the size of these volumes use:

hdsize

Defines the total hard disk size to be used. This way you can reserve free space on the hard disk for further partitioning (for example for an additional PV and VG on the same hard disk that can be used for LVM storage).

swapsize

Defines the size of the swap volume. The default is the size of the installed memory, minimum 4 GB and maximum 8 GB. The resulting value cannot be greater than hdsize/8.

Note If set to 0, no swap volume will be created.
maxroot

Defines the maximum size of the root volume, which stores the operation system. The maximum limit of the root volume size is hdsize/4.

maxvz

Defines the maximum size of the data volume. The actual size of the data volume is:

datasize = hdsize - rootsize - swapsize - minfree

Where datasize cannot be bigger than maxvz.

Note In case of LVM thin, the data pool will only be created if datasize is bigger than 4GB.
Note If set to 0, no data volume will be created and the storage configuration will be adapted accordingly.
minfree

Defines the amount of free space left in the LVM volume group pve. With more than 128GB storage available the default is 16GB, else hdsize/8 will be used.

Note LVM requires free space in the VG for snapshot creation (not required for lvmthin snapshots).

Advanced ZFS Configuration Options

The installer creates the ZFS pool rpool. No swap space is created but you can reserve some unpartitioned space on the install disks for swap. You can also create a swap zvol after the installation, although this can lead to problems. (see ZFS swap notes).

ashift

Defines the ashift value for the created pool. The ashift needs to be set at least to the sector-size of the underlying disks (2 to the power of ashift is the sector-size), or any disk which might be put in the pool (for example the replacement of a defective disk).

compress

Defines whether compression is enabled for rpool.

checksum

Defines which checksumming algorithm should be used for rpool.

copies

Defines the copies parameter for rpool. Check the zfs(8) manpage for the semantics, and why this does not replace redundancy on disk-level.

hdsize

Defines the total hard disk size to be used. This is useful to save free space on the hard disk(s) for further partitioning (for example to create a swap-partition). hdsize is only honored for bootable disks, that is only the first disk or mirror for RAID0, RAID1 or RAID10, and all disks in RAID-Z[123].

ZFS Performance Tips

ZFS works best with a lot of memory. If you intend to use ZFS make sure to have enough RAM available for it. A good calculation is 4GB plus 1GB RAM for each TB RAW disk space.

ZFS can use a dedicated drive as write cache, called the ZFS Intent Log (ZIL). Use a fast drive (SSD) for it. It can be added after installation with the following command:

# zpool add <pool-name> log </dev/path_to_fast_ssd>

Video Tutorials